Norway Aims Global Zero Emissions by 2050

Norwegian Climate and Environment Minister Tine Sundtoft attended a ministerial meeting in Berlin on Tuesday. The meeting brings together about 35 ministers from around the world and include all major emitting countries like the US, China and India. The meeting is held annually and is called Petersberg Dialogue. 

The state leaders Angela Merkel and Francois Hollande held introductions at the meeting and also participated in the debate.

In her speech, Sundtoft said that politicians must give a clear signal to the world they take seriously the goal that global warming should not exceed two degrees.

Objectives before the climate summit in Paris is not sufficient to reach the two-degree target. We must therefore agree on a long term goal in Paris to show that we take science seriously. Norway advocates that emissions in the world should be net zero in 2050, said Sundtoft.

She further said that each country must not necessarily be bound by the zero discharge target, but the sum of all the measures in the world must have a net zero emissions in 2050.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel also advocated the necessity of both short and long term ambitious goals. She mentioned in her speech several examples of progress in climate work, such as the cost of solar energy goes down, and efforts to reduce deforestation in rainforest countries. 

Norway is cooperating with Germany on forest conservation in countries like Colombia, Peru and Ethiopia.

Both she and French President Francois Holland urged more countries to announce their targets for emissions cuts. This must be done in good before the Paris meeting. They also said that both the transfer of money from rich to poor countries is a key issue. This is important to ensure that poor countries should increase their economic growth in a climate-friendly way. 

– Climate change is not only a threat but also an opportunity to find new good climate solutions, said Hollande.

Comments

- Advertisment -
Advertisement

Must Read

Comments