Christian Democrats’s Decision May Lock the New Government Formation in Norway

Even though the previous coalition block wins the majority of the seats again, the member of the block Christian Democrats (KrF) does not want FrP in the government.

Photo : Stortinget.

LATEST ARTICLES

After yesterday’s election results, many declared the victory of the current government by Conservatives (Høyre) and Progress Party (FrP). But the balances are more complicated than it looks. The two major parties which formed the coalition are dependent on the support of both Krf and Liberals (Venstre) to practically functioning government.

External supporter of the Solberg’s cabinet in the previous term, KrF makes it clear that they do not want to be a support party for a government in which Frp is in.
Deputy chairman of FrP, Olaug Bollestad told NRK that KrF can not guarantee four years support to the new government.

– KrF has stated before the election that we do not go to a government in which Frp is involved. We wanted to change the place with Frp, if it does not happen then we will be in opposition, she says.

Bollestad says that it costed them a lot to be a support party to a government in which Frp participated because KrF has had a long distance to some of the issues FrP advocates.

Another party of the block, Liberals (Venstre) is also considering whether they should go in a government with Frp.

Today, Venstre’s central government will discuss whether they will cooperate with Frp.

The party is in a position to make demands from the government. For example they can ask for certain posts without letting Frp go out of government, according to NRK.

A government consisting of Conservatives, Frp and Venstre will still be a minority government, which must be supported by either KrF or other parties in order to adopt policies and budgets in the parliament.

In the previous parliamentary term, either Venstre’s or KrF’s votes were sufficient to secure the majority of the proposals of Conservative and Frp in the parliament.

After yesterday’s election results, with decline for all four bourgeois parties, neither of the two center parties alone has enough seats to secure the majority.

Comments